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20130228
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
let's get to work. >> here is the main story we are following tonight on cnn, from new york city, across new england, up to ontario, deep snow fall, hurricane force winds now, plenty of cleaning up and digging out. across several states, a half million homes are without power tonight. take a look at this accumulation in wallingford, connecticut. that is 44 inches! the the city of poston saw the snow reach 21 inches deep there. that is where a tragic accident happened. a teenager claimed into this car to get warm. the tail pipe was blocked, in the snow and the boy died in a matter of minutes. >> ems were coming out of the boy, at around this point, i got a look at his face. eyes rolled back in his head. i have seen that look before. >> this is part of the country recovering from hurricane sandy, one of the most devastating storms to hit the east coast. it isn't a new phenomenon, experts say our weather patterns are changing due to global warming. we dispatched a team of team of cnn reporters across the country and around the world to investigate, how bad can these storms become? a
. >> people and cities once safe. now in the eye of the fury. >> i see the weather changing. absolutely. >> is this the era of the superstorm? >> water level is rising substantially. >> and are we ready? >> if this wall had been here -- >> for the next one? >> i've been telling everybody, the big flood is coming. we better start building the ark. >> living near the ocean, there's always that chance that the ocean is going to come take away everything that you've got. but never did i imagine that this was going to happen to me and my family and my community. >> even now, given all that has happened to him and his family, it is still hard for nick camerada to understand it all. he has lived here, along the shores of staten island, for two decades, with his wife and four boys. back in 2011, camerada survived hurricane irene. so he paid close attention to reports of another potential hurricane headed his way in late october. >> it's been a very fickle storm, but it's going to be sucked in here, into the northeast somewhere. >> we were all hoping that the storm was going to blow more towards
. adrift in the middle of the gulf of mexico. but by day's end, it's obvious this virtual floating city is almost completely powerless with nothing but back-up generators. passengers find themselves without hot water or working toilets, and eventually, without enough to eat. you can hear the desperation in the calls from the ship. >> it takes three and a half hours to get food. the smells -- i can't even describe them. there is sewage, raw sewage. pretty bad. you walk in the hallway, you have to cover your face. we don't have any masks for breathing. >> dead in the water, all anyone at sea or on land can do is wait. >> actually, the first day i was able to get through to tim, i cried. and one of my friends who was with me got through to her husband, and we cried, too. partly out of fear and frustration because at that point, we still didn't know exactly what had happened and if it would happen again. we still were very in the dark. that was very scary times, and yes, people are starting to lose it a little bit. tempers are flaring. people are being very snippy. >> with no air conditioni
the flighting city is almost completely powerless with nothing, backup generators, passengers find themselves without hot water or working toilets and eventually without enough to eat. you can hear the desperation in and the calls from the ship. >> all anyone on land or sea can do is wait. >> the first day i was able to get through to him, i cried. one of may friends that was with me got through to her husband. we cried. partly out of fear and frustration. at that point we still didn't know exactly what happened. and if it would happen again. we still were very in the dark. that was very scary times. yes, people are starting to lose it a little bit. tempers are flaring. people are being snip. >> reporter: inside mattresses line hallways. everywhere the smell of sewage. mary's 12-year-old daughter is on that ship with her daughter can i not imagine that the horror that they have had to deal with, no food, lines go to the bathroom. seeing urine and feces sloshing in the halls. ing in to eat. people fighting over food. >> reporter: by tuesday, with mood supplies dwindling p. carnival's and the c
of the gulf of mexico. but by day's end, it's obvious this virtual floating city is almost completely powerless with nothing but back-up generators. passengers find themselves >> dead in the water, all anyone at sea or on land can do is wait. >> actually, the first day i was able to get through to tim, i cried. and one of my friends who was with me got through to her husband, and we cried, too. partly out of fear and frustration because at that point, we still didn't know exactly what had happened and if it would happen again. we still were very in the dark. that was very scary times, and yes, people are starting to lose it a little bit. tempers are flaring. people are being very snippy. >> with no air conditioning, decks turned to tent camps. inside, mattresses line hallways. everywhere, the smell of sewage. >> oh, wow. >> mary's 12-year-old daughter is on that ship with her father. >> i cannot imagine that the horror that they have had to deal with, with no food, lines to go to the bathroom. seeing urine and feces in the hall, sleeping on the floor, nothing to eat. people fighting o
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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